What’s good everyone, I hope you’re all well. It’s time for this week’s post.

It’s funny, you know. As a writer, sometimes you can’t figure out what to write about. Other times, subjects quite literally land straight on your doorstep.

And that’s what happened to me last week.

It might seem like a small thing. And it is. But I did learn something from it and I want to share it with you. You can say it’s about taking the small things for granted but I’ll let you be the judge of that.

Here we go.

A Little Background Story

Alright, let me tell you what happened. It’s no fun if you can’t join me in laughing at me, right?

So, a couple of weeks ago I received a message from my phone provider. They said that they’d increased the price of my phone plan and that I had two weeks to accept or leave — so I left.

I’ve had this specific plan for at least 5 years and to be honest, it was very cheap. Too cheap for what I got, but I didn’t set the price and I’d accepted all the price bumps up until now.

I got tired of seeing how it just increased every year — almost 50% from when I first joined the plan. So yea, I decided to leave and sign for another provider.

A Catastrophic Mistake

Yea, that’s what went on inside of my head when this happened. I’m not going to lie to you, when I look back at it now, I can only laugh.

The mistake was that the new sim card didn’t arrive and got lost in the mail. Unfortunately, they don’t have a physical shop in my hometown, so I had to wait 5 days for the new sim card to arrive.

This was a big blow for me and, obviously a traumatic experience. I’m currently using my phone every day for work, which is fine but I learned how much I’m addicted. Especially when it’s not work-related.

I’ve been too addicted

I mean, who can be this attached to materialistic things? In my younger days, I always had to have the latest tech, the newest phone, and the best laptop. I don’t know why because I didn’t need it but it was status and something to show other people, I guess.

Now, I do need a good laptop to do my job as a freelance designer and content writer. I use my laptop for everything and I can’t settle for mediocre. That’s something I can say now, but not then.

Anywho, sidetracking here…

As much as I use my phone and laptop for work, I quickly realized that I use my phone way too much. I didn’t have an internet connection while waiting for the sim card, I couldn’t call or text anyone, and it was a great lesson.

I’m not going to lie. It was tough at first but as soon as I got used to it I didn’t even check my laptop for updates anymore.

For a solid five days, I didn’t check Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, etc. and I loved it. Not to sound corny but I felt like it was a life-changing lesson.

It felt like the missing sim card kickstarted something and I haven’t used my phone the same way since. As I’m writing this I don’t even know where my phone is — probably in my bed somewhere.

Tech-Free Evenings?

What saddens me the most is that I needed someone else to make a “catastrophic” mistake for me to realize this. But I’m interested in using it to make a difference in my life.

How about a rule that says no phone or internet from 7–10 pm every night? How great would that be? Only use the phone if someone is calling you about something urgent — otherwise, you leave it be.

I don’t know if it will work but I’m going to give it a try. If you’re reading this and have any recommendations, I’d love to hear them. It seems impossible but I’m already doing it in a way. Now it’s just a matter of consistency and not falling back to old ways.

It’s insane how little it takes to realize you need change, huh?

A Direct Lesson to My Own Business

On a different note, it’s a direct lesson that I can use in my own freelance business. My entrepreneurial career is still in its early stages but I’m currently pricing my services and products.

Pricing your services is tough. How much is too much and how little is too little? How do you find that perfect spot? That’s the biggest question and challenge I’m facing right now.

As mentioned earlier the phone plan has increased 50% in price over 5 years. Now it has reached a point where I and other people are leaving — how can I avoid that?

I don’t know if you can. We’re learning about pricing during my internship and they tell me to price it higher than I want to. It’s a challenge to price something higher than you want but it’s a good lesson.

The moment you make a mistake in pricing, you’re eating into your reputation or your profits

Katharine Paine

What if you scare people away with higher prices?

We worry about scaring people away with high prices. But what if you scare people away because you’re prices are too low?

Everybody knows that price and quality go hand in hand and that’s what I’m learning right now. Can I avoid people leaving in a couple of years if I increase the price of my service every year? Or should I set a higher price right now to avoid this in the future?

It’s something to think about and I can’t believe how much I learned from this catastrophic mistake. No matter what I need to focus on my pricing strategy and it’s a part of this great journey.

Thanks for reading,
Rasmus Bak

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Hi, I’m Rasmus. Founder of Clickidy — a freelance design and content writing company based in Denmark.

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Rasmus Bak

Rasmus Bak

Hi, I’m Rasmus. Founder of Clickidy — a freelance design and content writing company based in Denmark.

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